Griffiths Ormsby

The Griffiths Survey refers to three Ormsby people as tenants in Roscommon. These are in addition to the landowning Rev. William Ormsby (already covered in ‘Rich Ormsby and poor Ormsby‘). Isabella Ormsby has two houses and associated gardens at Drum, near Athlone. One of the houses was sublet. There is a death of Isabella Frances…

Rich Ormsby and poor Ormsby

In “Servant in Tonlegee”, I made reference to an article about Beechwood House. Almost in passing, there is a reference to an Ormsby estate. This required further investigation. There is a wealth of information to be found at http://goldenlangan.com/ormsby.html The earliest family record is of Richard de Ormesby who was born in 1020. A mere…

Servant in Tonlegee

As mentioned in ‘Ormsby or Armsby’, Bridget Ormsby was a servant living in Tonlegee at the time of her 1865 marriage to John Stanly. But which Tonlegee? There is a townland of that name to the west of Roscommon Town in the civil parish of Kilbride. There is another one to the east of Roscommon…

Ormsby or Armsby

I have written about the doubt that exists about the identity of my great grandmother. (See “Ormsby & Scott”) I have decided that it is time to put those doubts to one side. Evidence, one way or the other, may emerge from further research. As stated in “The Ormsby connection”, a marriage took place in…

Power of numbers

I am a member of the Roscommon DNA Facebook group. At the time of writing (April 2022), there are over 1,100 members. There are 1482 samples that can be cross checked on Gedmatch.com. (Some members manage samples on behalf of other people.) If I run the analysis on Gedmatch, with a minimum cut off of…

Caution: automated technology at work

There is significant competition between the websites that publish genealogical information. More records are added on a regular basis. New “bells and whistles” are added to improve the attractiveness, and functionality, of each site. The Genealogist (https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/) recently added a map function to the 1911 census returns. When you have found an address of interest,…

Where to go

Some of the reasons for moving location were covered in ‘Why move’. Once someone had decided to move the next question is where to go. There may have been a few people who used the random “pin in a map” method. It was far more common to follow established paths. In the early 1900s, my…

Why move?

For a genealogist, one of the advantages of large families is the evidence trail that they leave. Going back into the 19th century (and much later in some parts of the world) it was common for women to have 6, 8, 10 or more children. Through checking the records of births marriages and deaths, a…

Redington and Stanley

Using the criteria explained in ‘More on Brother 2’, I started examining a restricted number of Irish born Stanley men called Michael, James or Patrick on the 1861 census for Lancashire. One individual stood out. Living at 23 Court, Paul Street, Liverpool is Michael Stanley, a dock labourer. He was born in 1835 in Roscommon.…

More on Brother 2

I had my suspicions that Brother 2 (see Brother 2 and Still hunting Brother 2) may have been called Michael. Unfortunately, the Michael Stanley who died in Dewsbury in 1859 was aged one. His father was Thomas. At the time, I suggested that looking for an unknown name, in an unknown place, without even a…