Following in the footsteps

I visited Roscommon in 2014. I wanted to see for myself the places that my grandfather Patrick would have called home. I wanted to stand where he had stood. I wanted to walk where he had walked. The photos that I took on that trip have featured in these articles at regular intervals. In 2018…

Bogs in Belgium

According to my Ordnance Survey Ireland map, Clooneenbaun in County Roscommon (where members of my family lived until 1908) sits on the 70 metre contour line. Lough Creevin, I km to the north, is 64 metres above sea level. Lough Slye, just south of the N61 is at 57 metres. As explained, and illustrated, in…

Sounds of a life

As I wrote about some of Patrick’s experiences in the Great War, I started to think about the sounds that would have been familiar to him in a time of peace. The railway came to Roscommon in 1860. If you had not previously seen any form of transport larger, or faster, than a horse drawn…

Conscription

A wave of patriotic fervour swept the country when war was declared in August 1914. Thousands of men, in every part of the country, responded to Lord Kitchener’s call for volunteers. Over one million men had enlisted by January 1915. And by January 1915, it was clear that, far from being ‘all over by Christmas’,…

95 centimorgans

This blog explores the opposite problem to the previous one (Multiple clans). https://www.roscommonstanley.me.uk/geography/ireland/multiple-clans/ Ancestry has identified someone with whom I share 95 centimorgans (cM) of DNA. (Other testing companies are available!) This is by far the highest score that I have on my list. The next highest is 51. According to the wonders of the…

Multiple clans

When I started out on this voyage of exploration, in 2007, I knew almost nothing about my grandfather’s origins. I have discovered a lot in the meantime. I have files full of information. Perversely, there now seems even more that I don’t know. This is where you need to check out Donald Rumsfeld. In 2002,…

Jewel in the Crown

Following service in South Africa with the 3rd (line) Battalion of the Manchester Regiment (https://www.roscommonstanley.me.uk/military/boer-war-concentration-camps/ ), Patrick was transferred to the 1st Battalion on 28 October 1906. He was sent to join them in India. The 1st Battalion had also served in South Africa, departing in December 1904. They arrived in the port of Madras…

Searching for James Mullooly

Having failed to follow the trail of Elizabeth McDermott, what about James Mullooly? (James and Elizabeth were the baptismal sponsors for my Grandfather in 1883.) In 1901, there are two families called Mullooly living in Clooneenbaun. In House 3, there is John (37), his wife Bridget and four young children. In House 4, there is…

Elizabeth McDermott: who was she and where did she go?

The relative dearth of information about my grandfather Patrick has forced me to examine leads that I would not normally pursue. Recently, I re-visited some of my earliest records. In November 2007, I received a report from the Roscommon Heritage and Genealogy Company. The baptismal sponsors for my Grandfather Patrick in March 1883 were Elizabeth…

Missing from the records

In my quest for more information on Thomas Stanly (1807-1887) (https://www.roscommonstanley.me.uk/possible-relations/thomas-stanly-1807-1887/) I looked at the census return for Edward Naughton. He reported the death of Thomas. The document has a reference to a missing record. Edward, his daughter, son-in-law and family are listed at house number 13 on the sequence. On viewing a list of…